Stupid Azure Trick #8 – Take control of Management Certificate names

Examine your Windows Azure MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATES in the Windows Azure Portal (under “SETTINGS” in the left nav, then “MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATES” in the top nav). These are the certificates that control which people or which machines can programmatically manipulate your Windows Azure resources through the Service Management API.

Every time you initiate a Publish Profile file download (whether through the portal, with PowerShell, or through the CLI), a new certificate is generated and added to your list of management certificates. You cannot control these names – they are generated.

Upon examination, you may find that some certificates – like #1 shown below – have generated names. And also look at the several certificates immediately below #1 – they have similar names – also generated. These are hard to distinguish from each other.

SNAGHTML2f43f75e

But this is okay some of the time – it is convenient to let tools create these certificates for you since it saves time. It may be perfectly adequate on low security accounts – perhaps a developer’s individual dev-test account from MSDN, or an account only used to give demos with. But for a team account running production, you probably don’t want it to have 17 untraceable, indistinguishable certificates hanging off it.

Now look at the names for #2 and 3 shown above. They are custom names.

Managing Your Management Certificates Starts with Meaningful Names

While we can debate whether the custom names shown above are truly meaningful (this is a demo account), you can probably appreciate that seeing a certificate name like “BUILD SERVER” or “Person/Machine” (e.g., “Maura/DRAGNIPUR”) or “Foobar Contractor Agency” might be more useful than “Azdem123EIEIO” to a human.

Controlling Certificate Names

The Windows Azure Management Portal has some heuristics for deciding what to display for a certificate’s name, but the first one it considers is the Common Name, and will display its value if present. So the short answer: take control of the Common Name.

Here we show creating a Service Management certificate manually in two steps – first the PEM (for use locally) and second deriving a CER (for uploading to the portal).

openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:1024 -keyout mycert.pem -out mycert.pem -subj "/CN=This Name Shows in the Portal"
openssl x509 -inform pem -in mycert.pem -outform der -out mycert.cer

Note the use of -subj "/CN=This Name Shows in the Portal" when generating a PEM in the first command. The specified text will appear as the description for this certificate within the Windows Azure Portal. OpenSSL is available on Linux and Mac systems by default. For Windows, you can install it directly, or – if you happen to use GitHub for Windows – it gets installed along with it.

For a pure Windows solution, use makecert to create a Management Certificate for Windows Azure.

Considerations

Once you assume responsibility for naming your own certificates, you are simultaneously also taking on generating them, deploying the certificates containing the private keys to the machines from which your Windows Azure resources will be managed using the Service Management API, and uploading the CER public keys to the portal. To make some parts of this easier – especially if you are distributing to a team – consider building your own publish settings file. Also, realize the same certificate can be used by more than one client, and the can also be applied to more than one subscription on Windows Azure; its a many-to-many relationship that’s allowed.

Resources

Create and Upload a Management Certificate for Windows Azure

X.509 Certificates

Build your own Publish Settings File

[This is part of a series of posts on #StupidAzureTricks, explained here.]

One thought on “Stupid Azure Trick #8 – Take control of Management Certificate names

  1. Pingback: Reading Notes 2014-03-17 | Matricis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s